Faith

Leadership Lessons from Luke 5.21-26

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Leaders face many tests from the critics.

Once again we find Jesus facing a hostile group out to disprove him and his leadership. Jesus will face many more tests over the course of his ministry. You will face tests in the midst of your attempts to lead.

Leaders must have a call. Note what Paul tells us in Romans 1.6-7.

“And you are included among those Gentiles who have been called to belong to Jesus Christ. I am writing to all of you in Rome who are loved by God and are called to be his own holy people.”

Has God called you to be a leader? You may not think so but the Bible would suggest otherwise. Each one of us are called. At the very least you are called to belong to Christ, receive salvation, move out of darkness, and called to make disciples. This is leadership.

You won’t fully embrace your call to lead until you realize you are called by God to follow.

Leaders must have conviction. Belief that what you are doing matters and makes a difference. Otherwise, why lead? Why endure all the naysayers who question you, unless you have a message?

Leaders must have compassion. Note that Jesus bring healing to the paralyzed man. He was not simply interested in proving himself. It was his compassionate move that settled the argument.

Verse 26 tells us that the former critics were seized with amazement. “We have seen extraordinary things today.” They said.

Leaders amaze their critics by following their conviction to lead in the midst of criticism.

What has God called you toward?

What extraordinary things does God want to do through you today?

 

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Leadership Lessons from Luke 5.18-20

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Are you open to leading?

Ask God to give you a vision that brings healing to others. It may be physical, emotional, or mental, but each of us should ask Him for a vision aimed at bringing life to others! As people perceive your vision is meant to help, they will come to you.

Four men bring a paralyzed man to Jesus. They climb up a ladder to get to the roof. They dig a hole in the roof. Imagine being in the home as seeing parts of the roof falling on the living room floor? They lower him down to Jesus. In other words they do all they can. They lead from their strengths. People will work hard when they see great vision.

Immediately Jesus offers forgiveness to the man. He deals with the man’s sins and past before dealing with the man’s future. The men want Jesus to heal the paralyzed man so he can walk again. Jesus wants to heal the man’s soul so he can do life.

Vision aimed only at the temporal needs is only temporary. Project a vision that seeks to empower people’s future in greater ways than they could ever hope or dream.

Perhaps the man only thought of walking, only to return home and look for a job. Jesus gives him this and so much more. He offers hope, future and eternity. Regardless of whether you realize it or not, all vision eventually leads to eternity.

The question is how will your vision lead others for both now and forever? It’s not a question of either/or, but rather a both/and.

 

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God’s Promises

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Did you know there are over 5000 promises God gives us in the Bible? Even though he has made several promises, he has never broke any of them. Every promise was made with you in mind! Here are just a few of his promises.

God rescues you when you are in trouble. Psalm 50.15

God promises to be your protector. Psalm 84.11

God gives you his peace. John 14.27

God will never leave you or abandon you. Hebrews 13.5

God walks with you in times of trouble. Psalm 138.7

God’s love never ends. 1 Chronicles 16.34

God meets your everyday needs. Matthew 6.33

God promises abundant life. John 10.10

God promises that if we search for him we will find him. Deuteronomy 4.29

God promises to listen when we pray. Jeremiah 29.12

God is your strength and help in trouble. Psalm 46.1

God heals your wounds and hearts. Psalm 147.3

God gives you eternal life. John 3.16

God helps you. Hebrews 13.6

God directs your paths. Proverbs 3.6

God cares for you. 1 Peter 5.7

God comforts you. Psalm 23.4

God gives you rest. Matthew 11.28

God strengthens us. Philippians 4.13

God provides for your needs. Philippians 4.19

God is faithful to keep all his promises. Hebrews 10.23

God comforts you. 2 Corinthians 1.4

God has power to do everything he has promised. Romans 4.21

God promises not to lie. Numbers 23.19

God promises no more tears, no more pain, no more suffering in heaven. Revelation 21.4

Take a moment to share one or more of these with someone.

Which one(s) bring the most comfort to you?

 

Leadership Lesson from Luke 5.17

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Calm in the storm.

I absolutely love how this verse begins. “On one of those days,…”

Ever have one of those days? Of course you have. We all have. You may very well be having one of them today. Jesus seemed to have a few of them himself.

Pharisees and teachers from all over were sitting, listening to Jesus. They had come from several towns, including Jerusalem. This fact informs us that there were several opinions in the room that day. Some of which were opposed to Jesus and His message.

As we will discover this account is the first of five incidents of controversy Luke tells us of. Jesus is facing a bit of a rough ride.

I have no way of confirming this, but human nature tells me that as Jesus is speaking, other teachers were outlining their responses and criticisms of all he was saying. To say he was outnumbered would be a gross understatement.

However, in the midst of surrounding opposition, Jesus remains focused on the mission and able to maintain his composure. We see this in the second half of verse 17.

“And the power of the Lord was with him to heal.”

His mission remained the cornerstone of each and every conversation and period of testing. Though surrounded by people who resisted him, he boldly moved forward with the task at hand.

You’ll also note that he continued to stay sensitive to what was going on. Jesus understood the power to heal was with him. He didn’t allow the crowd to diminish his ability to fulfill his mission.

Allow me to sum it up. Jesus was moved by compassion for the man he was about to heal, rather than the crowd around him. He was focused on the needs of the one over the opinions of the many.

How can we learn to stay in tune with what God is doing when the crowd says otherwise?

How do you react to opposition in your life?

 

 

 

Leadership Lessons from Luke 5.15-16

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As a leader you want people to follow you. It’s been said, “If you’re leading a group and no one is following you, you’re simply taking a walk.”

Great crowds gathered to hear Jesus speak. Additionally, the people came in from far away places to hear him. News about Jesus was spreading.

Who doesn’t want a great crowd? As leaders we all want to have more influence. Note a few things about these two verses.

  1. Jesus puts action to his message. He doesn’t just talk about healing but he does it. People want to ‘see’ the vision, not just hear about it. It’s called vision for a reason.
  2. The healed man spreads the word about Jesus. Do right by people and they will tell their friends. Use your gifts and people will want to hear more and share it.
  3. The writer, Luke, places Jesus’ preaching ministry ahead of his healing ministry. “…great crowds gathered to hear him and to be healed…” Actions support the message, not the other way around.
  4. Jesus took time alone. He needed time to recharge and be refreshed. We all do.
  5. He prayed.

No one had more mission to accomplish than Jesus. He set out to bring salvation to the entire world. Yet there were times when he had to be alone and pray.

Make sure, you as a leader, do the same. Doing so ultimately helps those you are serving.

Which of the five things mentioned above do you struggle with the most?

How are you at taking time to be alone and pray?

 

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Leadership Lessons from Luke 5.12-14

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There will be moments in your leadership when those we refer to as outcasts of society come to you looking for help. How you respond determines the magnitude of your leadership.

Jesus is approached by a leper. Lepers were not to approach people. As a matter of fact they were to call out, “leper” or “unclean” when people were near so as to not come close. This social outcast falls to the ground in front of Jesus and then, rather than call out “unclean” he asks for healing.

The leader who wishes to be in the limelight and with the crowd that offers him or her something in return is no leader. It’s the one who searches for a towel to wash other’s feet, rather than seeks the title, that is a true leader.

Your leadership will be defined by offering help to those who can give back nothing in return. Too many individuals desire only advancement. Jesus is only concerned about the condition of the man.

We see this further displayed when Jesus tells the leper to go and show himself to the priests. What is meant by this?

Jesus doesn’t stop at the man’s healing. He urges the man to go show himself so the former leper will be reunited in fellowship with others. Healing is the beginning. Community it the desired outcome.

The former leper was also incredibly lonely. He needed to be restored on the inside as well as the outside.

How is your leadership reflected when others approach you for help?

How are you restoring people to community through your leadership?

 

Leadership Lessons from Luke 5.1-5

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This portion of Jesus’ journey begins with three words, “On one occasion…” Jesus had many of these type of events during his time on earth. John tells us that this is just one example of Jesus’ style of leadership.

People pressed in to hear the word of God. We can conclude two thoughts from this. First Jesus has said and done enough up to this point for people to have a desire to hear the message. Second, Jesus was not so much interested in promoting himself, but rather, the message.

Don’t get caught in the trap of leading people to yourself. Lead them to what brings life to their situation.

Notice Jesus’ leadership in the midst of chaos. The crowd is pressing. It’s loud. People are jockeying for position. The smell of fish and sweat. The breeze off the sea. Some are washing their nets, others are walking past wondering what’s up, and parents are attempting to keep track of their children.

It’s in the midst of all of this that Jesus formulates a strategic move. He jumps in the boat and immediately summons Peter to put his net into the deep water. The crowd is silenced. Jesus is focused on his mission.

The vast amount of distractions don’t seem to bother him. He is steadfast and resolute. Leaders know how to remain focused in the midst of chaotic happenings. They have a plan and stick to it. While others are watching what is happening, leaders are making it happen.

How do you handle chaos? Are you a fight, flight or make it right individual?

 

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